Art, blog, Event, Kansas City, Story, Uncategorized

Hipster Scene, my house the trading post

DonaldQuack

Hipsters are associated with places like Chicago, New York, and San Fransisco. WordPress.com is my hipster scene. Here the talented writers are artist, illustrators, and photographers. They have interests in farming, fashion, history, language, poetry, and an array of art.

WordPress.com is my favorite place on the web. I can get lost for hours. I am mad for followers. I try harder and harder each day to find meaningful words to share and sigh that my photo album only has a handful of pictures.

Linked to my Facebook page, a more private site, where 355 of my friends view my WordPress posts. I am dedicated to providing my Facebook readers one good photo with the first dozen or more words the most meaningful or most interesting statement. Because that’s about all my Facebook friends will read. They don’t take advantage of the full story and they are quick to ‘like’ the photos more than the content. I don’t believe my Facebook friends follow the WordPress link. In return, I read their posts of fluffy kittens, family illness, naughty rants, and birthday gifts.

I receive meaningful and thoughtful comments from my WordPress followers. A hipster scene, although not limited to the men and women in their 20s and 30s, WordPress.com bloggers value independent thinking. Among their thoughts are the counter-culture, and progressive politics. They appreciate art, all types of music, creativity, intelligence, and they are witty.

Go, Go, WordPress.com!

I now want to share my dream to publish the following Children’s Book, Squeaky The Duck.Sq-cover

chick-pg-1Bigger-RevRow-pg-3Under-a-tree-color-5He-quaked-and-he-quaked-colorSQ-qnd-EddieDaffyduck  Daffy and Donald move over, Squeaky is taking over. http://petduck.wordpress.com

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Art, blog, History, Kansas City, photography, Story, Uncategorized

Street Names-my house the trading post

Map of Old Westport, Kansas City, Missouri

Map of Old Westport, Kansas City, Missouri

Kansas City’s streets, prior to 1872, were frequently impassable by reason of the soft clay, kept continually wet by the overflow of spring water in the streets. The Johnson family were one of the first settlers to cross the Blue river, which is south of Westport. The Blue river was redesigned and gave birth to Brush Creek.  The road that crossed their land was called Woodland Avenue, because when it was first laid out, there was a heavy growth of timber which gave the name to the street.

main_missourihomestead-westlake The City River Market area, is where the City of Kansas City begins. The picture shows the same area of Independence Avenue and Main Street (today and in 1830)

The peculiar bend in lower Main street is explained by the fact that when the street was opened and graded southward the city encountered an obstacle at Missouri Avenue. A Mr. McDaniels lived in line of the new route and he wanted one hundred dollars for interfering with his well and front yard. After several weeks spent in negotiation the city council decided the city could not afford to pay for such improvements. They compromised by turning the street westward, thus saving Mr. McDaniels’ yard and well.

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Some of the streets were named for Kansas City people: Guinotte, Hardesty, Shelley, Scarritt, Bales, Goodrich, McGee, Troost, Garland, Scott, Warner, Watkins, Winants, Tichenor, Smart, Ridge, Heist, Campbell, Chouteau, Merceir, Martin, Mastin, Hasbrook, Munford, Hale, Henderson, Gregory, Holmes, Hunter, Baird, Salisbury, Hopkins, Marsh, Shcaffer, Merrill, Anderson, Allen, and Dunham.

The following thoroughfares were named for cities and states: Baltimore, Denver, Brooklyn, Colorado, Quincy, Illinois, Delaware, Alton, Indiana, Missouri, Pennsylvania, Milwaukee, Michigan, Lawrence, Lexington, Rochester, Santa Fe, St. Louis, Virginia, Wyoming, St. Paul, Springfield, Fort Scott, Richmond, Winchester, Frankfort, and Independence.

picsantafetoKCThese streets were named after statesmen, authors, and soldiers: Madison, Douglas, Lincoln, Lafayette, Franklin, Blaine, Monroe, Jefferson, Washington, Jackson, Cleveland, Harrison, Garfield, Benton, Fremont, Clay, Sherman, Hamilton, Gladstone, Irving, Whittier, Bryant, Randolph, Peery, Boone, Fulton, Aberdeen, Bayard, Pendleton.

Numerous changes have been made in the names of Kansas City’s streets since the period shortly after the Civil war. Previous to that time most of the streets bore the names of the members of the old pioneer families. A few have been retained.

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